Blog

Here you will find important tips and news about Florianópolis.

24May, 2017

Airlines in Brazil

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Be aware that in both Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo, a domestic flight may depart from a different airport than the one where your international flight arrived. In Rio de Janeiro, international flights arrive at Antonio Carlos Jobim International Airport, while many domestic flights originate at Santos Dumont Airport or Galeão Airport. Likewise, in São Paulo, international flights arrive at Guarulhos International Airport while many domestic flights originate at Congonhas Airport. Traveling between airports can sometimes take a considerable amount of time on the congested streets. Plan your itinerary […]
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22May, 2017

Weather in Brazil

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Remember that Brazil is a tropical country straddling the Equator but, because of its sheer size, the climate can often vary considerably from north to south even during the same season. Because it lies in the Southern Hemisphere, seasons in Brazil are exactly the opposite of those in the Northern Hemisphere: winter— June 22 to September 21 spring— September 22 to December 21 summer— December 22 to March 21 autumn— March 22 to June 21 With the exception of traveling to some regions in the south and southeast in the […]
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20May, 2017

Brazilians Health Issues

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Almost all Brazilian cities have treated water supplies. Those that don’t use artesian well water. Either way, you’re probably not going to get sick from drinking the water, anything washed in it or ice cubes made from it. But if the taste of chlorine is not your favorite, it’s probably best to drink only água mineral sem gás (non carbonated mineral water) or com gás (carbonated) which is readily available almost everywhere. In Rio de Janeiro, the problem is not the water, it’s the delivery system which is old and […]
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18May, 2017

Laws & Legal Issues in Brazil

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Even as a visitor and a citizen of another country, when you are in Brazil you are subject to all Brazilian laws. During your travels in Brazil, you may encounter Federal Military Police, Federal Highway Police, Customs Agents, Tax Revenue Agents and other law enforcement agents, and in cities, Civil Police and Traffic Police. Always obey any order any police officer or agent gives you and always show them both courtesy and respect. It doesn’t matter that you may witness others disobeying laws or are cajoled into going along with […]
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16May, 2017

Safety & Security in Brazil

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We asked a experienced Brazilian traveler if he thought traveling in Brazil was dangerous. He responded without hesitation, “only if you do something stupid!” Just as it’s not a good idea to walk around a poor neighborhood in any large North American or European city at night, alone, with your pockets stuffed with cash, wearing a Rolex and an expensive camera slung around your neck, it’s not a good idea to do it in any large Brazilian city either. Think The vast majority of all Brazilians are honest, forthright, hard […]
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14May, 2017

Using Credit & Debit Cards in Brazil

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Using a credit or debit card can be an ideal way to avoid carrying more cash than you require for just incidental expenses. Most hotels, restaurants and stores in Brazil readily accept Visa and Master Card. After you’ve made your purchase (in reais), the charge is sent on to Visa or Master Card. They convert the charge from reais to dollars or the currency of your country at the official exchange rate the day the charge is processed. When you receive your monthly statement, the charge will be listed in […]
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12May, 2017

Brazilian Currency

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Brazil’s currency unit is the real (plural = reais) and is made up of 100 centavos. The real is issued in denominations of 1 real (1 real notes have been discontinued but the coin is everywhere), 2 reais,5 reais, 10 reais, 20 reais, 50 reais and 100 reais. Prices are written in reais using the symbol R$. Centavos are issued in denominations of 1 centavo (discontinued and rarely seen), 5 centavos, 10 centavos, 25 centavos and 50 centavos. It’s best to carry nothing larger than 10 or 20 reais bank […]
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10May, 2017

Brazilians – Social Customs

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Generally, because Brazilian culture is European based, most common European social customs are observed in Brazil. In both business and social situations, shaking hands upon meeting or taking leave is customary. But Brazilians are also very warm and caring people. Brazilian women may kiss one (or both) cheeks of other women upon meeting them and, often, kiss men in a similar manner. In some social situations, a man or woman may shake hands upon meeting a Brazilian woman and receive a kiss from them on one (or both) cheeks when […]
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8May, 2017

Brazilians — Characteristics & Culture

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No matter to what extent other places in the world may claim to be a “melting pot”, they pale in comparison to Brazil. Brazilians can proudly lay claim to a diverse and complex ethnic and racial heritage dating back over 500 years that includes immigrants from Europe (Portuguese, Italian, German, Jewish, French, Dutch, Spanish, Greek, Polish, Czech and more), Syria, Lebanon, other middle Eastern countries (often referred to in Brazil as “Arabs” no matter their origin) and Japan, added to Africans (originally brought to Brazil as slaves) and native indigenous […]
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4May, 2017

Are you a Gringo and/or a Marajá?

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Let’s get this out of the way. Simply put, to Brazilians, any foreigner in Brazil is a gringo (females are gringas). It doesn’t matter where you hail from or your ability (or inability) to speak Portuguese (although, if your Portuguese is very good, you may be able to “fake them out” for a while). To Brazilians, if you are a foreigner in Brazil, you are a gringo. Period. Don’t take it personally because it’s not considered derogatory in Brazil as it often is elsewhere. The term marajá (maharaja or rich […]
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